Posted: 2:55 pm Monday, March 10th, 2014

Another Braves pitching worry: Beachy has arm tightness 

By David O'Brien

 

CLEARWATER, Fla. – The last thing the Braves needed Monday was more pitching-injury concerns, and that’s what they got when Brandon Beachy left his Grapefruit League start against Philadelphia after just two innings due to tightness in the biceps area of his pitching arm, near the elbow.

Beachy was limited to only five starts in 2013 before having his second elbow surgery in a 15-month span, an arthroscopic procedure Sept. 26 to remove a bone chip. He had Tommy John ligament-transplant surgery on the elbow in June 2012.

“I’m not worried at all about it,” Beachy said after allowing two hits and two walks in two innings, and throwing 14 strikes in 37 pitches. “I’ve seen the doctors. They’ve done everything. My ligament’s fine. I’ve got some inflammation in there and it got a little too tight in my biceps and it was just a little unproductive to keep going and pushing through it.”

Beachy’s early exit came just under 24 hours after Braves starter Kris Medlen left his start against the Mets Sunday with pain in the forearm/elbow area, and the Braves were still waiting to learn the severity of Medlen’s injury when Beachy left Monday’s game.

“Obviously more of the guys in camp come into play, some of these other pitchers,” Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez  said of the mounting starting-rotation health issues. “But let’s not count (Beachy) out just yet…. Roger (McDowell, pitching coach) saw it and said, ‘Let get him out of there.’ Nothing good could happen if we kept trying to push him along.”

Brandon Beachy left Monday's game against Philadelphia after two innings due to biceps tightness.

Brandon Beachy left Monday’s game against Philadelphia after two innings due to biceps tightness.

Beachy said the discomfort felt nothing like his elbow before his surgeries.

“It’s tough to describe,” he said. “When I went down in 2012, it felt like a stabbing sensation. Last year it felt full in the joint and it was just shooting out all around. This is nothing like either of those. It’s just kind of a dull tightness, and it just kind of … just gets to where I can’t finish anything.

“I’ve been throwing through it. That’s just normal from what I hear, you just get through it. Obviously I wanted to go four today, but I’m not really worried about it.”

Asked if he thought he would be ready when the season begins in three weeks, Beachy said, “We’ll see. We’ll see how it recovers.”

On Sunday, Medlen left a game against the Mets with what was initially diagnosed as forearm strain. He was examined Monday to determine whether the injury was more severe, and the Braves were still awaiting MRI results late Monday afternoon. Medlen had Tommy John surgery in 2010.

Beachy said he had some tightness in each of his previous two spring-training starts but that it worsened Monday. He said he’d been assured before Monday that it was something he could try to pitch through and that it might loosen up after throwing some.

He also said that in his previous starts, the tightness did dissipate after he began to throw. But on Monday, it worsened instead of improving.

“He thought it was something that he could get through it. And we let him, to a certain point,” Gonzalez said. “Again, I don’t think it’s something that we need to panic about, and we’ll take it a day at a time.”

Six days earlier, Beachy threw three scoreless, hitless innings against the Phillies. He had been scheduled to pitch four innings Monday.

“Today was worse than it was last time and the time before, to the point where I didn’t think throwing through it was productive,” Beachy said. “I’m not scared at all. Like I said, this isn’t something I came in here today feeling 100 percent, so I knew this is something I’ve been dealing with. It had been getting easier the harder I threw and the more I pushed. Today, it just got a little too tight on me.”

Beachy was asked whether he thought he’d have an MRI as a precautionary measure  to rule out a serious injury.

“I don’t think so. Obviously we’re going to go with what the doctors tell me, but I really don’t think there’s any reason to do that,” he said. “I know exactly what it is, what it’s been, what I’m dealing with. It’s just kind of part of the process of coming back from something like this. Obviously it’s a little farther out than I’d like to be dealing with it.”

13 comments
Preacher721
Preacher721

Reference the comment we did not have these arm problems when Leo was pitching coach.  Might I bring up the numerous surgeries to John Smoltz, the career ending too shortly of Steve Avery, not to mention the yips of John Rocker and the yips that hit Mark Wohlers, could not hit the backstop at one time.  No Leo was not a miracle worker, he did have however one of the best pitching staffs in all of baseball.  Any pitching coach with a starting trio of Glavine, Smoltz and Maddux would have had a great run regardless.  But to put the blame of the arm injuries on the pitching coach is just nonsensical.  Did not hear ever of anyone shooting at the hitting coaches when players like Freddie Freeman, Jayson Hayward, Justin Upton, Dan Uggla or Chipper Jones or Brian McCann pulled their obliques and could not hit for six weeks.  Go figure!

KevinE
KevinE

From webmd.com          http://answers.webmd.com/answers/1170922/what-are-the-risks-of-a?guid=2


A magnetic resonance imaging scan is a painless radiology technique that has the advantage of avoiding X-ray radiation exposure. There are no known side effects of an MRI scan. The benefits of an MRI scan relate to its precise accuracy in detecting structural abnormalities of the body.

AlaskaBravesFan
AlaskaBravesFan

Please remember that an MRI means exposure to a significant amount of radiation.  In other words, too many MRI's are dangerous!  It may take years for the effects to manifest, but the radiation is not trivial.  So, unless you decide it is absolutely necessary, avoid MRI's.  Since effective pitchers are very valuable, it's a great temptation to expose them to too many MRI's.  Bad idea.


ABF

KevinE
KevinE

Why wouldn't you go ahead and get an MRI just to be safe and TO KNOW.  Not like they can't afford it, not like it's PAINFUL.  I don't understand when athletes DON'T get the very best diagnosis available, IMMEDIATELY.  Maybe they're sort of scared to find out the truth.

AlaskaBravesFan
AlaskaBravesFan

It is important to remember that Tommy John surgery is quite a sophisticated procedure, but also that the surgeons who perform it, like Dr. Andrews, are excellent.  Nonetheless, players are pitting mere human tissues against uses that are extreme.  What's amazing isn't that pitchers' arms get hurt, but that they can keep up those intense motions for as long as they do.  Look at the number of MLB players who have TJ surgery each year!  These guys are making a great deal of money.  It takes considerable talent and motivation to play at a high level and to be willing to undergo the surgery.


Don't be surprised when we see multiple players going down with arm issues.  Humans didn't evolve with the throwing of a baseball as a survival issue.


Oh, and the pitching coach, who is one of the best in baseball, is not the problem!


ABF

58Supersports
58Supersports

Looks like all the "ifs" are becoming  big problems. All these arm problems didn't happen with Leo. ( just saying)

Garcia  is not the answer...per FG saying "Thank God they signed him in winter. That is a joke.

BravesFan1966
BravesFan1966

Red flags all over the place. He had all winter to rehab after problems late last year.  Now this.  Having had all these arm surgeries and shoulder surgeries, if he is still having problems, this is a huge red flag to me.

Remarkable3
Remarkable3

It's not looking good for Opening Day. We have three pitchers struggling with health issues or just struggling! It looks like the Braves will be giving more young arms a closer look this year.

BradleyBreeze
BradleyBreeze

Doesn't look as though he is even  close to being ready at the start of the season...........

supsalemgr
supsalemgr

Is the demon that followed the UGA football last season moved on to the Braves?

1995oneyearwonder
1995oneyearwonder

who is actually prforming he surgery on pitchers like Beachy and Medlen.? someone who works for James Andrews and is an apprentice ?

this is becoming a bad joke


BravesFan1966
BravesFan1966

@1995oneyearwonder No.  Dr. Andrews is the best in the business otherwise you would not be having MLB and NFL players lining up outside his office.  This surgeries were done by Braves ortho drs.